Truly a Fountain of Youth

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or 5 Reasons to Stay Involved with Young People!
by Jim Grout, Executive Director, High 5 Adventure


I have long been proud of the fact that all of our program staff at High 5 still work with young people...yup, including me. I've been doing so for all of my entire career in adventure education which started in 1976. You see, you can't "graduate" out of working with young people at High 5, and that's no accident. There's a couple of reasons for that, none of which are the 5 mentioned in the subtitle above. Those 5 will come up later.

The biggest reason quite simply, is that young people keep you honest. You can't make things up and fool them because they see right through you and that's very humbling and good for the soul.

They also inform the work we do at every level. We can't be in the business of training teachers as adventure educators and be too far removed from the very people they are serving. Our adult trainings are strengthened by every youth program we conduct. As an education major in college, I could always determine very quickly which professors still had their feet in the world of the classroom from those that were living out the life of a professor shrouded in theory but lacking in reality. I pledged to myself then, I would never let that happen to me.

Last Spring I was presenting at a High 5 fundraising event and outlined the various audiences that we work with which include young people, adventure educators, police / military personnel, corporate audiences and professional athletes. I shared that in one 10 day period I worked with:

    a group of young people from 16 different countries,
    a middle school faculty group,
    a corporate executive team,
    and, the Boston Bruins NHL hockey team.

Not only did the learnings and insights from all of those groups inform one another and strengthen the quality of each program but they strengthened my skills as a facilitator. Additionally, every non youth program we conduct is viewed as an opportunity to further our mission by connecting a corporation as a supporter of our work with youth This could be in the form of a company like C & S Wholesale Grocers of Keene, NH funding a local school program or the Boston Bruins providing a spokesperson and the support of the Bruins Foundation for scholarship aid for the Edge of Leadership.

As Executive Director I admittedly don't do the amount of trainings I used to do in my full time trainer days; but I will never stop entirely and I will always cherish the moments that are spent with young people.

IMG_0632.jpgAs for those 5 Reasons to Stay Involved with Young People...it's simple, they are:
1) Landon 2.) Gretchen 3.) Chloe 4.) Zachary and 5.) Lisbeth

Position Announcement:
Development and Communications Manager
High 5 Adventure Learning Center is a non-profit educational organization recognized worldwide for its brand of adventure and experiential education.

Some of the world's most respected schools, colleges, sports teams, institutions and businesses turn to us for help to improve the way they live, learn and work together. Our Training and Team-Building, Professional Development and Certification, and Challenge Course Services are custom-designed to help our clients discover what's possible and expand their culture of internal leadership.

Beginning in 2013, High 5 established a set of ambitious growth goals and has met or exceeded those targets each year. With a $2.2 million annual budget and a staff of 20, High 5 is on track to continue rapid growth in all of its programs.

As our infrastructure grows, High 5 is establishing a new position of Development and Communications Manager to increase our external presence and build internal systems and capacity for contributed revenue. The Development and Communications Manager will work closely with High 5's Executive Director, Associate Executive Director, three program directors, and two-person administrative team, with the opportunity to help shape the position from the ground up. This is a full-time position, located at High 5's offices in Brattleboro, VT, with generous benefits.

A successful candidate will be a self-starter, able to keep projects on track and on time, with strong teamwork and communication skills to fit High 5's culture. The position requires the ability to think strategically about shaping the new development and marketing approaches, as well as the ability to implement tasks with attention to detail. Reporting to and in partnership with the Executive Director and Associate Executive Director, the Development and Communications Manager will be responsible to:
● Work with High 5's program and administrative staff to create smooth systems with integration and coordination of tasks relating to development and communications.
● Assist High 5 in developing and executing a year-round fundraising plan, including donor development, donor appeals, grant-writing, and preparations for a capital campaign.
● Support High 5's marketing and communications activities, and integrate them with development strategies.
● Assist in the planning and execution of special events.
● With the Executive Director, educate, and support Board members in developing a fundraising culture.

To apply please send a cover letter and resume to: hiring@high5adventure.org

Position Announcement:
Development and Communications Manager
High 5 Adventure Learning Center is a non-profit educational organization recognized worldwide for its brand of adventure and experiential education.

Some of the world's most respected schools, colleges, sports teams, institutions and businesses turn to us for help to improve the way they live, learn and work together. Our Training and Team-Building, Professional Development and Certification, and Challenge Course Services are custom-designed to help our clients discover what's possible and expand their culture of internal leadership.

Beginning in 2013, High 5 established a set of ambitious growth goals and has met or exceeded those targets each year. With a $2.2 million annual budget and a staff of 20, High 5 is on track to continue rapid growth in all of its programs.

As our infrastructure grows, High 5 is establishing a new position of Development and Communications Manager to increase our external presence and build internal systems and capacity for contributed revenue. The Development and Communications Manager will work closely with High 5's Executive Director, Associate Executive Director, three program directors, and two-person administrative team, with the opportunity to help shape the position from the ground up. This is a full-time position, located at High 5's offices in Brattleboro, VT, with generous benefits.

A successful candidate will be a self-starter, able to keep projects on track and on time, with strong teamwork and communication skills to fit High 5's culture. The position requires the ability to think strategically about shaping the new development and marketing approaches, as well as the ability to implement tasks with attention to detail. Reporting to and in partnership with the Executive Director and Associate Executive Director, the Development and Communications Manager will be responsible to:
● Work with High 5's program and administrative staff to create smooth systems with integration and coordination of tasks relating to development and communications.
● Assist High 5 in developing and executing a year-round fundraising plan, including donor development, donor appeals, grant-writing, and preparations for a capital campaign.
● Support High 5's marketing and communications activities, and integrate them with development strategies.
● Assist in the planning and execution of special events.
● With the Executive Director, educate, and support Board members in developing a fundraising culture.

To apply please send a cover letter and resume to: hiring@high5adventure.org

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From Training Team member Lisa Hunt:

When I hear "Champions" and "High 5" in the same sentence, my mind first goes to the Boston Bruins winning the Stanley Cup in 2011. However, I want to honor the history of High 5 and champions by putting the spotlight on another winning team- the Greenwich Girls Swim and Dive Team.

The team arrives at High 5's Brattleboro campus today for their annual start of season team retreat. They have been coming for more than 18 years. Trainers Lisa Hunt, Liz Moore and Ryan McCormick have the honor of spending the weekend with this winning team this year.

The Greenwich Girls Swim and Dive team were Connecticut State Champions last season, and are looking to defend their title. Their approach to winning is not from an individualist perspective but from a team orientation - no individual won an event. As reported by the Greenwich Time in fall of 2015:

Greenwich's recent victory at the girls State Open Championships perfectly illustrated that there's no substitute for depth in championship swimming/diving meets. The Cardinals captured their 11th State Open championship with an impressive team score of 581 points at Yale University and they did so without winning an event.

"To a certain degree, what was really neat about our win this year is that we had 22 swims without winning an event -- we were able to amass a lot of points because we had a lot of depth and everyone contributed," Cardinals coach Lorrie Hokayem said.

Indeed, for the Cardinals, it was truly a team win. "That was our goal," said Hokayem, who recently concluded her second year at the helm.

"At the beginning of the season, we said that our depth would have to shine through. Everyone knew that each swim counted every meet that we competed in."

High 5 Adventure is honored to partner with and support the Greenwich Girls Swim and Dive team once again.

Coach Hokayem summed things up when she wrote to us following her first trip to High 5 with the team back in September of 2014, "I feel like it would have taken me 6 weeks to get to know each of the girls as well as I know them now if we never went to Vermont."

Ready to bring your team of individuals together? High 5's team is ready to support you with:

• Customized programming.
• A proven track record.
• Sports, governmental, law enforcement, schools and corporate experience.
• A beautiful setting.
• Extraordinary customer service.
• And a whole bunch of heart!

Give us a call today to get your team scheduled! 802.254.8718 or 877.356.4445

Dat first came to High 5 for the 2015 Annual High 5 Practitioner's Symposium with the East Hartford Youth Services Bureau student group. His vivacious enthusiasm and positive attitude stood out in the crowd!

Dat's personality and the way he showed up - ready to Connect, Empower and Lead -stood out. Ryan McCormick, Edge of Leadership's (EOL) Director, quickly identified him as a great potential participant and contributor for the EOL Summer Program and invited him to attend.

Not surprisingly, Dat brought the same excitement and charisma to the summer program as a leader, motivator, energizer, and spreader of positivity.

EOL facilitator Anne Louise Wagner recalls, "I was fortunate to be in Dat's dialogue group on the final day of the summer program. This gave me the opportunity to see a different side of Dat. When a teacher in the group shared about a challenging moment, Dat identified with her obstacles, experiencing similar challenges in his life, and had the courage to share. The stories and heartfelt exchange was a very special moment for me".

We are thrilled that only is Dat interested in returning to EOL's 3-day summer program in 2016 as a Student Facilitator, but he has chosen to pursue a degree in Adventure Education.

Dat writes,

"I am excited to say that I will be majoring in adventure education at Plymouth State University in the pursuit to further my skills and experience! Everyone at High 5 has made a big impact in that decision and I would like to say thank you for the opportunity."
Dat.jpg


Dat, thank you from all of us at High 5 for sharing your news! We'll be watching for your future contributions to adventure education, and to the world!


If you are interested in learning more about Edge of Leadership or how your high school or youth program can participate in the Edge of Leadership Summer Program, give Anne Louise or Ryan a call at 802.254.8718 or 877.356.4445

This was just one of the many questions teachers came away with after shadowing a high school student for one full day of school. The shadowing initiative, which most teachers called "eye-opening", was developed and organized by Edge of Leadership students at Lincoln Sudbury High School.

Here is the story of how it began...

It started four years ago when Lincoln Sudbury High School (LSHS) teacher Amanda Klein and several of her students attended Edge Of Leadership's (EOL) High School Summer Program at High 5 for the first time.

Amanda, referred to by her students as Klein, is a true teacher champion, believing not only in her students but also in authentic youth empowerment, voice, and leadership. Klein was a perfect EOL fit and after a great first year, she returned with an even larger group of amazing students the next year. Among them, a 15-year old student named Heidi who, although nobody knew it at the time, would come to have a profound impact on the entire EOL program - and on the teachers and students at her high school.

The story continues...

Each year EOL high school students are asked, "What can you do to improve the community at your high school?" The students of LSHS identified a strong disconnect between faculty and students. They determined that their focus would be to build stronger student-teacher connections, but the question remained, "How are we going to do that?"

This is where Heidi comes in. Heidi had come across an article entitled "A Veteran Teacher Turned Coach Shadows 2 Students for 2 Days- A sobering Lesson Learned". The article is about the amazing insight a teacher/coach gained from shadowing students for two days. Inspired by the article, Heidi suggested the EOL group at LSHS organize a similar experience for their school's teachers. Heidi, mentored by Klein and supported by her peers, put her ideas into action. This was no easy task, but the EOL group crafted a plan and presented their proposal to the administration. High 5's EOL staff spent time helping students design an action plan not only for conducting the day, but also to capture and share the participating teachers' key learnings with the entire staff and administration.

In the first session, only 2 teachers shadowed students but their response to the experience was inspiring. The teachers were surprised how much their experience could improve their teaching. Through this powerful, student-led professional development opportunity, teachers gained not only insight, but also empathy.

After the success of the initiative at LSHS and in recognition of her leadership, we invited Heidi to return to the EOL Summer program to play a new role as a student facilitator. Heidi and two other students from LSHS shared their initiative with the other EOL groups attending from high schools across New England. Several of the EOL groups began planning similar initiatives, including our home team at Keene High School.

Recently, LSHS conducted another student shadow day but this time 9 teachers participated over two weeks. The success of the first session convinced LSHS administration to budget for substitutes and organize class coverage for a much larger number of teachers. Again, teachers responded that the experience was "eye opening."

To capture the learning, the team interviewed several of the participating teachers. The team is currently putting together a presentation for the entire faculty. During a recent site visit, Anne Louise and Ryan were able to do a mini-interview with students that you can view at the link. Below the link we've also summarized some of the teacher feedback following their experience.

You can watch the video here.

This is a perfect example of leadership in action and the goals of High 5's Edge of Leadership program.

Heidi has had a pivotal role in shaping how High 5 support schools after the EOL Summer Program. Her name will forever be part of EOL history - and part of the culture of student/teacher connection at Lincoln Sudbury High School.

Sampling of actual teacher reflections:

"The transition from one class to another, it was very challenging to switch mindsets from one subject to another so quickly (Physically and Mentally.)"

"It is easy to "check out" when I had trouble understanding the material."

"Physical switching, going from one building to another, getting to class on time, how quickly some activity was starting at the beginning of class; there was not a lot of extra time; feeling tired at the end of the day, exhausted mentally."


"The day seemed very long. How do students remember everything from the whole day? It seemed like the time between the first block and the last block was an eternity."

"I really enjoyed the experience overall, especially the free blocks. Now I see why students love and need them. I didn't expect that at all."

"Transition-- made me think about my own teaching style and what actually works for students/ audience. In the end, the class is not for me but the students. I'll now be much more aware. I'll start class with music to help students connect to the present class. I knew it before but never experienced it."

"Making sure that everyone is reached, not necessarily everyone talks, but that everyone gets engaged in different ways."

"Cognitive/ academic flexibility that is necessary for students. Have to be good at many different skills throughout day."

"I think that it is really important for teachers to see what a day looks like for students. It is busy, dynamic, frustrating, and takes a lot of fortitude! I will definitely keep that in mind as I plan my future classes."

"Makes you remember what you have forgotten about students' challenges and struggles. I make connections to my shadowing experience all the time while teaching."

For more info on Edge of Leadership, contact Ryan McCormick or Anne Louise Wagner at High 5 - 802.254.8718 or 877.356.4445

by Jim Grout


During my 38-year career of adventure education, I think I have worked with every kind of group imaginable. I've with spent time with students at every grade level from schools throughout the northeast and around the world; including young people from Iraq, Bosnia, Cyprus, Turkey, Northern Ireland and about twenty other countries. I've gone to a prison to work with young offenders who were on their "last chance" before permanent incarceration and kids from a half way house that could have ended up there. I've trained thousands of teachers and adventure educators from the US and countries like Taiwan, Japan, Singapore, China, Canada, Mexico, Australia, New Zealand, Norway, Sweden and England. I've led corporate teambuilding workshops with BMW, GE, Johnson & Johnson, CEMEX Corp., Hannaford Foods, C & S Wholesale Grocers and specialty groups like the Massachusetts State Police and the US Postal Service. And finally I've had the opportunity to work with professional sports teams that include the NHL's Boston Bruins and the NJ Devils and the German National team in Mannheim, Germany. All of these groups have taught me so much about facilitating and understanding people.

As your experience grows you gain confidence in your skills and your ability to "deliver the goods" to any audience feels very assured. At 64 years of age, I honestly find it a fun place to be in my career. I feel I've earned it and enjoy it immensely.

But recently, I had an experience with a group like nothing I have ever experienced before. As we say in our Edge of Leadership program, "it's all about connections," and that's what made the experience so powerful. The group that came to High 5 was the Center for Donation & Transplant, CDT based in Albany, NY. This organization makes organ donations happen. When a donor becomes available, they are the people who meet with the donor family, coordinate with the giving hospital and find the organ recipients. And they do all this in clockwork like fashion over a short period of time so that as one life is ending, many others may continue to live. Their world is one that most of us never see, as it happens on the fringes of life and death in a place where tragedy and joy meet.

On July 1 2006 my family and I met the people from the Center for Donation & Transplant in a hospital room in Burlington VT. as our 21-year-old son Nick lay on life support following an accident. It was here that my understanding of organ donation went from academic to very real and that my connection with CDT was formed forever. Nick had signed his driver's license to be an organ donor and my wife and daughter and I simply became a reflection of his wishes and an admirer of his soul. While our lives were changing forever, the CDT people were doing what they are trained to do which in this case was to find six recipients for his organs. They did just that, and a 14 year old received a kidney and a 60 year old a heart and four others received life-sustaining organs as well. As time went on CDT coordinated our anonymous communication with various organ recipients via letter. Eventually this led to a meeting years later with the recipient of Nick's heart.

Fast forward to Wednesday Nov. 4, 2015 and imagine 25 CDT staff arriving at High 5 for a day of team development and imagine that I am the lead trainer. I, along with High 5 staffers, Liz Moore and Phil Brown, had crafted a good plan for the day so we were ready. But the ready part for me started weeks earlier as I tried to wrap my head around meeting all the people who had touched my life and that of my family in such a profound way. For me, this was not a job for the day; it was a special reunion with people I'd barely met. And there was one reunion unlike all the others for it was with the CDT staff person who was actually with my family and me during our long days in the hospital. Her name is Jenn and she has a big smile, a warm heart, a graceful manner and a brave soul.

While the agenda of the day was about them as a team at CDT, the backdrop was the richness found in our shared reality. I knew with every fiber of my body the meaning of the work that they do and they knew that I knew it. Sometimes verbalized but often times not, this reality provided richness to our day that was of another world. It was the best of what we do as humans when our heart and soul are truly present with one another.

On a personal level this day helped me to continue to move forward in my life of trying to live without my son Nick. While this is a never-ending task, the energy and meaning of our time together provided me a moment of great joy and satisfaction.

I started this blog by saying that I'd worked with every kind of group imaginable during the course of my career. Little did I know that such a gathering was on the horizon of my life and the life of High 5. Fortunately, what has been true so many times before, the power of our work in connecting people in wonderful and meaningful ways shined brightly once again.

Thank you CDT for all that you do to make good things happen on the fringes of life and death in a place where tragedy and joy meet.


Note: If you'd like to learn more about the Center for Transplant and Donation go to http://www.cdtny.org. And if you'd like to learn a little more about Nick and his donation go to Gift of Life Stories on their web page.

Hands rose defiantly, paralleling the frosted blades of grass surrounding us on top of the High 5 hill that chilly morning. One by one, the 5th graders confidently recited quotes of perseverance retained from their most recent writing project.

They shared . . .

"Persistence is what makes the impossible, the possible likely, and the likely definite."
- Robert Half

"A river cuts through rock, not because of its power, but because of its persistence."
- Jim Watkins

"We are made to persist. That's how we find out who we are."
- Tobias Wolff

IMG_2430.JPG

The conversation continued as we transitioned onto the challenge course, voices fading as young eyes gazed upward at the high elements suspended between tall white pines. Before climbing high, the group was challenged to complete "Knot my Problem," an activity where rope is tangled and then connected to each participant, requiring them to unweave the mess to reform a single circle of rope. Minutes into the initiative the tune changed from excitement and anticipation to frustration and helplessness. Students impatiently scuffed at the thick orange layer of pine needles coating the forest floor, exclaiming . . .

"Can we be done now? Can't we just move on?"

"This knot is impossible. We will never finish this!""
`

It's in moments like these in Edge of Leadership (EOL), that we see how students truly struggle with perseverance. We have heard this before in different ways, how students need more "grit" and character building. We agree, and we have learned a big piece of that is simply giving students more time. Tina Lepple, a 5th teacher from Keene, NH shared her observation that there are few opportunities students have today to push through challenging experiences - it is always time to move onto the next subject, the next thing.

The 5th Graders that day, imprisoned by the knot they had created an hour before, were finally able to form a circle and then disconnect from the rope. As facilitators, we gave space for them to process informally at first, side conversations erupting with laughter as well as some stern faces. We asked . . .

Who felt frustrated during that experience? When and why?

How many people wanted to quit? How did you handle that feeling?

If we were to do it again, (which we wont!)what would YOU want to do differently?

The concept of "timing out" and perseverance was also demonstrated to us by an EOL Summer High School participant as she resisted crossing the swampy pond. She slowly realized that EOL was different and she could not just wait for time to be up. She had to choose herself if she wanted to take on the challenge, not let time decide for her. In the end, she made the decision to cross the pond. I would not say that she was immediately happy with her decision, but the next morning, she shared how that lesson was pretty powerful for her.

This theme of perseverance has woven its way into all of our EOL programming in response to the needs of students of all ages with whom we work. To stay in the loop about all the ways EOL challenges groups to be their best, check out our website as well as our Facebook page.

Submitted by Anne Louise Wagner, Edge of Leadership Adventure Educator

This activity works with every group size and every age from elementary to corporate teams!
All you need is two decks of Ubuntu cards.

"We aren't sure why this didn't make it into the Ubuntu Activity Guide. Ryan and I had a good laugh about that because we use it all the time". Chris Ortiz

Ubuntu Mimeograph
When working on a project, we rely on team members to do their best work to contribute to the success of the project team. If that work is not organized and agreed on by all team members, details can be missed and distrust in team members can fester. The object of the activity is for the team to recreate a pattern of cards that the facilitator has created in another, out of site, space.

Resources/Materials: You will need 2 decks of Ubuntu cards.

Set up:
Create a pattern of 10- 15 cards out in a hallway or in another room. Place some cards single image side up and others multi image side up. Turn some sideways or angled. Include the remainder of the deck as a part of the pattern.

Give the group the second deck of cards.

Procedure:
• Each team member may only leave the room to go look at the pattern of cards one time.
• They must go alone, no talking or technology allowed while in the other space.
• They may not touch the cards that are a part of the pattern.
• When they return, they can describe what they saw to the other group members.
• Can the group recreate the pattern exactly as it is in the other space?

Facilitator tips: Snap a picture of the pattern at some point so at the end you can lay your phone down to check the groups work before you discuss.

Reflection Ideas:
• How did the group decide to organize information? Was the strategy and vision of the plan clear for all group members?
• In what ways does this activity reflect the groups typical organization? Similarities? Differences?
• What lessons could be brought back to the workplace as a result of this exercise?

Saboteur Layer
Prior to playing, pass around folded up note cards to everyone and tell the group to secretly look at the card. Tell them that if someone has an X on the inside of their card they are the saboteurs for this activity and their goal is to prevent the group from being successful. (I never actually put an X on a card but adding this layer of distrust on the team can be a powerful discussion point.)

The story of Two Championship Cups, Two Countries & One Coach


In short, they are our latest success story at High 5; another example of Connect - Empower - Lead coming to life. They represent the power of teambuilding and the essence of what we try to achieve with the human spirit. They are the 2015 National Champions of Germany's professional ice hockey league, DEL, the proud winners of the Championship CUP!

But how did they become a part of the High 5 story and their season a focal point of interest throughout our year? Why did what began as a simple phone call in July 2014 from a man named Geoff Ward, end in such satisfaction and jubilation for us all at High 5? Mannheim H5.jpg

To understand the significance, you have to go back to another phone call in June of 2010. This too was from a man named Geoff Ward, but at that time, he was the assistant coach of the National Hockey League Boston Bruins along with head coach Claude Julien. That one single phone call was the beginning of a saga that would see the Boston Bruins coming to High 5 for a two-day retreat in September of 2010 and the winning of their first Stanley Cup Championship in 39 years. It also led to two more pre-season Bruins retreats and two more strong playoff showings.

Fast forward to the call in July 2014."Hi Jim, Geoff Ward here. You've probably heard by now, I resigned from the Bruins and took the head-coaching job in Manheim, Germany with the Adler Mannheim. I would like to have you and your team come over and do what we did with the Bruins that first year."

The operative phrase here is, "do what we did"? In this case it meant crafting a two-day program design that utilized adventure education activities and initiatives to meet the team's goals and desired outcomes. With both the Boston Bruins and the Adler Mannheim the goal was to help create a powerful team chemistry that would lead to a Championship. For the Boston Bruins this meant the Stanley Cup, for the Adler Mannheim, the DEL Cup.

I always like to think that we play a small but significant part in the pursuit of such a goal. All teams want to win. It's an inherent part of who they are; it's in their DNA. But it takes more than simply "wanting" to win to actually win. Teams need three things to be victorious, talent, a good coach and the right chemistry. At High 5, we help jump start the chemistry by setting the stage for the players and coaches to connect well together, to feel empowered and then begin to lead one another. And as much as we provide a spark to make this happen, the critical glue is the ability of the coach to continue to follow-up throughout the season and keep alive the themes and aspirations outlined by us early on. No one does this better than Geoff Ward, he's an exemplary coach who believes in the power of team chemistry as a tipping point in a team's performance. He's been right twice, in 2011 with the Boston Bruins and in 2015 with the Adler Mannheim.

It's no coincidence that this "tipping point" of performance is also what makes the difference in schools and businesses. If we can improve the ability of a classroom of students to work together as a team of learners or the members of a business to function more effectively as a team, their performance improves. It's that simple. We've known the success of this formula for a long time and our work over the years has always aspired to make it happen with each and every group.

What makes the Boston Bruins and the Adler Mannheim story a special one is that in the end there was a trophy proving that it all works! Thank you Boston Bruins, Adler Mannheim and Geoff Ward!

Two Cups, Two Countries & One Coach... yes indeed!

Recent Comments

  • Rachel Sampson: I would like to try this but can't find where read more
  • Jen Ottinger: Hi Ryan! Great words to live by. read more
  • markcollardinc: Ryan, I saw Michelle Cummings present this exercise earlier this read more
  • markcollardinc: Ditto! We - Ryan, Nate and me - all reading read more
  • markcollardinc: Hey Ryan, why is this activity called Ubuntu CIRCLE when read more
  • higherbeing: Love it! read more
  • Wes: Hi Ryan. I am currently looking into establishing a physics read more
  • Ryan McCormick: Thanks Nate, I love this activity and find useful in read more
  • Nate Folan: Right on Ryan! This activity is very effective. Thanks for read more
  • Ryan McCormick: Well, it depends on the size of the group. With read more